Xstroke Raspberry Pi

PiScreen – 3.5″ TFT(480×320) with touch control for the Raspberry Pi – Kickstarter launched

We have launched a Kickstarter campaign for a 3.5″ TFT (480×320) with touch control, we have given it the name of PiScreen.

PiScreen includes a 3.5″ TFT with touchscreen control, PCB and components needed to add this display to a Raspberry Pi.

PiScreen connects right on top of the Raspberry Pi GPIO pins

 

The TFT used is the best quality we have seen so far.

TFT TFT TFT
PiScreenKit PiScreenKit

Some specifics;
Touch Screen Resistive
Display construction 480 * 320 DOTS
LCD Controller ILI9481
Touch Screen ControllerXPT2046
Display Color Multicolor, 65536 colors

Head on over and check it out.https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2135028730/piscreen-a-35-tft-with-touchscreen-for-the-raspber

Software PWM on a Raspberry Pi

If you want to control the brightness of a LED, the speed of a DC motor or the direction of a servo, you will need PWM.

The video shows PWM being used to control the brightness of some LEDs.

Pulse-width modulation (PWM) is used to control the amount of power supplied to electrical devices, especially to DC motors, servos and LEDs.

PWM is able to achieve this by quickly turning off and on the power to the device. The measurement for this is duty cycle.

Duty cycles describes the proportion of ‘on'; a low duty cycle corresponds to low power, because the power is off for most of the time.  A high duty cycle corresponds to high power, because the power is on most of the time.

Duty cycle is expressed in percent, 50% is when the power is on half the time and 100% being fully on.

pwm

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Pan and Tilt control for the Raspberry Pi Camera

I was fortunate enough to get access to a prototype of Pi-Pan from www.mindsensors.com during their kickstarter.
The kickstarter has finished and they reached their goal.   However they will be selling Pi-Pan from www.mindsensors.com at a future date.


Pi-Pan provides Pan and tilt movements for your Raspberry Pi Camera.
Pi-Pan can pan 180 degrees (from left to right) and tilt 110 degrees (top to bottom).

Pi-Pan comes with two servos, a controller board, screws, a mount and instructions.  It also comes with some python code that shows how the device can be operated.

(The controller board in the image below is a prototype and the production board will be a lot smaller.)

pipan-opt pipan2-opt pipanparts-opt

 

Controlling the GPIO on a Raspberry Pi with a Touchscreen

In this post I show how to control the GPIO on a Raspberry Pi using a touchscreen.
This is a follow up on my previous post Programming for a Touchscreen on the Raspberry Pi

The TFT doesn’t come up too well in the above video. The picture below gives a better idea of how it looks. Click to enlarge

Touch Screen button example

Link to the code;
https://github.com/mwilliams03/Pi-Touchscreen-basic.git

In the above code touchbuttons.c creates three buttons on the TFT which will be used to turn on/off three LEDs.

This can easily be changed to add more buttons.
touchbuttons.c also requires WiringPI and needs to be compiled with gcc -g -o buttonExample buttonExample.c -l wiringPi
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